Single Letter

HAM/1/6/6/2

Letter from Eva Maria Garrick to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


Typed where marked

Sep 30th. 1885


      The mornful and melancholy Ditty of
the Dear Blackamoor's metamorphosed wife
Gave me infinite pleasure and delight; and
I am persuaded that he will have the same
cause of complaints against You to the end of
his life. Amen! --
      You want now to know why I did not answer
Your charming letter sooner? and I tell you
because I did not receive it till just now, when
I returned from Camden place; from whence I
was expected at home every moment, so no letter
was sent after me. I have been in the North:
Mr. Boyle's illneʃs put a stop to our expedition:
The Gentleman inlisted himself in Lady Tyrconnels
Service where he was put upon so hard Duty
that he fell into a violent fever, broke a
Blood veʃsel and all appearance of going into
a consumption. When his mother was informed



she began to be very much alarmed and sent to that
abominable house, desiring him to come immediately
to Thames Ditton; which he consented to; but all
the while he was under the Doctor's hands,
that wretched woman Lady Tyrconnel came every
day to the house belonging to Ly H: Vernon, next
to Mrs. Walsingham's Garden. Pray do not wish
for many sons except You could be sure they
that in time they would have all the bad
quality your Blackamoor now poʃseʃses.
      Has Madam More written to you and told
You all how Mrs. Yearsley treated her and still
does? yes, with an unheard of ingratitude;
because Miʃs More Secured the money for
her Children; and would prevent that wretch
of squandering it away. I hope Miʃs More will
shut up her feelings and throw the writings of
Trust at her head; and have done with her.
      You invite me very kindly to come and see you
in your sweet & happy Habitation; and so I will take



you by Storm the first moment I have it in My Power;
as there is no body in the world I shall be more
pleased to see again then -- gueʃs whom --
But I expect to find you converted into a Black=
amoor
likewise if you go on flirting on horseback
in all weather with the Gentleman who does me
the Honour of giving me for his Toast. Pray
present my best Respects to him and tell him I
long as much to see him as he does me.

      God bleʃs you all! and I am inclined I
think pretty much to love you as long as I live
and that you will alway find me to remain
Your faithful

M: Garrick


Hampton Septr. the 30: 1785



Mrs: Dickenson
Taxal Chapel le Frith
by Derby
Derbyshire

Mrs. Garrick
1785 Sepbr-
[1]

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red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. These lines are written upside down at the bottom of page 3.

Normalised Text





      The mournful and melancholy Ditty of
the Dear Blackamoor's metamorphosed wife
Gave me infinite pleasure and delight; and
I am persuaded that he will have the same
cause of complaints against You to the end of
his life. Amen! --
      You want now to know why I did not answer
Your charming letter sooner? and I tell you
because I did not receive it till just now, when
I returned from Camden place; from whence I
was expected at home every moment, so no letter
was sent after me. I have been in the North:
Mr. Boyle's illness put a stop to our expedition:
The Gentleman enlisted himself in Lady Tyrconnels
Service where he was put upon so hard Duty
that he fell into a violent fever, broke a
Blood vessel and all appearance of going into
a consumption. When his mother was informed



she began to be very much alarmed and sent to that
abominable house, desiring him to come immediately
to Thames Ditton; which he consented to; but all
the while he was under the Doctor's hands,
that wretched woman Lady Tyrconnel came every
day to the house belonging to Lady H: Vernon, next
to Mrs. Walsingham's Garden. Pray do not wish
for many sons except You could be sure
that in time they would have all the bad
quality your Blackamoor now possesses.
      Has Madam More written to you and told
You all how Mrs. Yearsley treated her and still
does? yes, with an unheard of ingratitude;
because Miss More Secured the money for
her Children; and would prevent that wretch
of squandering it away. I hope Miss More will
shut up her feelings and throw the writings of
Trust at her head; and have done with her.
      You invite me very kindly to come and see you
in your sweet & happy Habitation; and so I will take



you by Storm the first moment I have it in My Power;
as there is no body in the world I shall be more
pleased to see again than -- guess whom --
But I expect to find you converted into a Blackamoor
likewise if you go on flirting on horseback
in all weather with the Gentleman who does me
the Honour of giving me for his Toast. Pray
present my best Respects to him and tell him I
long as much to see him as he does me.

      God bless you all! and I am inclined I
think pretty much to love you as long as I live
and that you will always find me to remain
Your faithful

Maria Garrick


Hampton September the 30: 1785



Mrs: Dickenson
Taxal Chapel le Frith
by Derby
Derbyshire


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 1. These lines are written upside down at the bottom of page 3.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Eva Maria Garrick to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/6/6/2

Correspondence Details

Author: Eva Maria Garrick (née Veigel)

Place sent: Hampton

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: Taxal, Chapel-en-le-Frith

Date sent: 30 September 1785

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Eva Maria Garrick to Mary Hamilton. The letter concerns Hannah Harper More and Mrs Yearsley [née Ann Cromartie (bap. 1753, d. 1806), poet and writer]. Garrick asks if More had informed Hamilton about her treatment by Mrs Yearsley. She writes of the 'ingratitude' of Yearsley. More had 'Secured the money for her [Yearsley's] Children, and would prevent that wretch of squandering it away'. She hopes that More will have nothing more to do with her. Dated at Hampton.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 445 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2016/17 provided by The John Rylands Research Institute.

Research assistant: Isabella Formisano, former MA student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Andrew Gott, dissertation student, University of Manchester (submitted June 2012)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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