Single Letter

HAM/1/6/8/22

Letter from John Hope to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


      I hope, my dear Miʃs Hamilton, you can
tell me your Mama is better, & that
you are in Spirits to reliʃh the Comedy
I ʃend you. -- I laugh'd, 'till my Sides
were ʃore, at it, laʃt night; -- but, with
me, all pleaʃure is incomplete, if I can
not ʃhare it with my Friends. -- You'll
find part of young Marlow's Character
very like a Perʃon's of our Acquaintance;
-- the defective part of it, I mean; not
the virtuous & most meritorious. --
      I alʃo ʃend you the Copy of my
political Letters which I promised you. --
I hope you will not, now, think the
Publication ʃo very abʃurd; when I tell
you, that I foreʃaw my preʃent Embar=
=raʃsment
, & that I ʃhould have no otherbetter
means of ʃhaming my Relations into
doing ʃomething for me, than by



making as much Noise in the World as
I poʃsibly could, without doing any thing
to injure my Relations; -- for that
ʃame Reaʃon I publiʃh'd the Letter
(you'll find with These) which at firʃt
gave Meʃsrs: Hope & Co: uneasineʃs, but
which I knew could never hurt Them,
& would intereʃt them in preventing
me from becoming a Bankrupt. -- My
chief own interest, however, was but
the ʃecondary motive of that laʃt Publi=
=cation
. -- I really imagined it would be
of immediate publick ʃervice, & in the End would
aggrandize the Character of my old Patrons. --
      I'll conclude with a Reflection applica=
=ble
to the subject: -- Those who paʃs for the
most prudent & wiʃe, in the World, ʃeldom
can carry on a Design, without being
deiscovered. -- They Eyes ------------ of every
one is upon them; their every action is



watched with the moʃt ʃuʃpicious attention,
& they can undertake nothing, without
every one putting himʃelf on his Guard,
as if ʃomething momentous was intended
to happen. -- The man, on the contrary,
who paʃses for a thoughtleʃs, rattling
fellow, can do what he pleaʃes, without
even being ʃuspected of looking farther
than his Nose before him. --
      In anʃwer to all this Nonʃense,
give me juʃt two Lines, to ʃay how
your Mama does; & that, in thus
opening a little more of my ma
ways & manners (as you call'd them)
I have loʃt nothing in the Eʃteem
of my dear good Friend. -- Her's most
ʃincerely & Affecly

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Normalised Text


      I hope, my dear Miss Hamilton, you can
tell me your Mama is better, & that
you are in Spirits to relish the Comedy
I send you. -- I laugh'd, until my Sides
were sore, at it, last night; -- but, with
me, all pleasure is incomplete, if I can
not share it with my Friends. -- You'll
find part of young Marlow's Character
very like a Person's of our Acquaintance;
-- the defective part of it, I mean; not
the virtuous & most meritorious. --
      I also send you the Copy of my
political Letters which I promised you. --
I hope you will not, now, think the
Publication so very absurd; when I tell
you, that I foresaw my present Embarrassment
, & that I should have no better
means of shaming my Relations into
doing something for me, than by



making as much Noise in the World as
I possibly could, without doing any thing
to injure my Relations; -- for that
same Reason I publish'd the Letter
(you'll find with These) which at first
gave Messrs: Hope & Co: uneasiness, but
which I knew could never hurt Them,
& would interest them in preventing
me from becoming a Bankrupt. -- My
own interest, however, was but
the secondary motive of that last Publication
. -- I really imagined it would be
of immediate public service, & in the End would
aggrandize the Character of my old Patrons. --
      I'll conclude with a Reflection applicable
to the subject: -- Those who pass for the
most prudent & wise, in the World, seldom
can carry on a Design, without being
discovered. -- The Eyes of every
one is upon them; their every action is



watched with the most suspicious attention,
& they can undertake nothing, without
every one putting himself on his Guard,
as if something momentous was intended
to happen. -- The man, on the contrary,
who passes for a thoughtless, rattling
fellow, can do what he pleases, without
even being suspected of looking farther
than his Nose before him. --
      In answer to all this Nonsense,
give me just two Lines, to say how
your Mama does; & that, in thus
opening a little more of my
ways & manners (as you call'd them)
I have lost nothing in the Esteem
of my dear good Friend. -- Her's most
sincerely & Affectionately

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Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from John Hope to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/6/8/22

Correspondence Details

Author: John Hope

Place sent: unknown

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: unknown
notAfter 1785 (precision: high)

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from John Hope to Mary Hamilton. He sends a copy of his political letters and also a copy of a comedy which he 'laugh[e]d at till my Sides were sore'. He continues on the effect that publication of his letters might have on his relations. He had foreseen his embarrassment [over debt], and he hoped that publication might shame them into helping prevent his bankruptcy, though without causing them hurt. The letter continues on Hope's reasons for publishing the work.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 379 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2017/18 provided by Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Georgia Tutt, MA student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: George Lee, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2018)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 2 April 2020

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