Single Letter

HAM/1/6/8/3

Letter from John Hope to Mrs Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


Dear Madam,

      I ʃtaid after Mrs ------ laʃt night, expect=
=ing
you would have resumed the Subject of Mrs:
------ tho' I was unwilling to do it myself, in
the humour you then seem'd to be against me. As
there is no body's good opinion I value much
in this Town, but your's & Miʃs Hamilton's, I
muʃt tell you, that my Suspicion of having loʃt
That, provoked me againʃt the Tattlers of the place.
      I long supposed you could not be blind to my Affection
for Miʃs Hamilton, but I imagined, that as a ʃensible
Woman you wink'd at it; as, from your paʃt kindneʃs to me,
it was alʃo natural to imagine, you could have no
other Objection than my want of fortune, which
might hereafter be accidentally removed. A remarkable
Change, however, in your & Miʃs H:'s behaviour to
me of late, put me on gueʃsing at the Cause; -- and
I found that Mrs: ------ had told you, you did wrong
to truʃt Miʃs H: in my Company. -- This, & the idle
Stories of other people, may have occaʃion'd a pre=
[judice]
[aga]inʃt me, which I will not attempt
------------------ the contrary, I confeʃs to you, that
------------------------if I was certain MiʃsH had had any Affection for me, & there was
------a probability [ probabi]lity of my making her happier than
------------------------she appears to me to be at home, I ʃhould not think I behaved
------either ungratefully [ ung]ratefully or injuriously to you, in marrying
------without Your --- ur conʃent; for it has always been the
doctrine taught me by my own father, & which
I ʃtill profeʃs; that Children are, by the Law of
God & Nature, entitled to the Dispoʃal of their



own Perʃons, when arrived at the Years of Discretion,
altho their Parents ought ever to offer them their
beʃt Aʃsiʃtance & Advice. -- Should this declaration
of my ʃentiments, my dear Madam, give you any
Concern, I ʃh (which, from Miʃs H:'s behaviour to
me, I think it never ought,) I ʃhall not take
amiʃs your giving me no more invitations to your
Houʃe; & I promise you, (to make you entirely easy,)
that before Miʃs H:'s Return from London, ------
I ʃhall have found out ʃome Other Retreat. --
      I am, with conʃtant regard,
Dear Madam, Your much obliged &
                                                         affecte: hum---: Servt:
John Hope

Sunday, 13 Decembr: 1774

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Normalised Text


Dear Madam,

      I stayed after Mrs last night, expecting
you would have resumed the Subject of Mrs:
though I was unwilling to do it myself, in
the humour you then seem'd to be against me. As
there is no body's good opinion I value much
in this Town, but your's & Miss Hamilton's, I
must tell you, that my Suspicion of having lost
That, provoked me against the Tattlers of the place.
      I long supposed you could not be blind to my Affection
for Miss Hamilton, but I imagined, that as a sensible
Woman you wink'd at it; as, from your past kindness to me,
it was also natural to imagine, you could have no
other Objection than my want of fortune, which
might hereafter be accidentally removed. A remarkable
Change, however, in your & Miss Hamilton's behaviour to
me of late, put me on guessing at the Cause; -- and
I found that Mrs: had told you, you did wrong
to trust Miss Hamilton in my Company. -- This, & the idle
Stories of other people, may have occasion'd a prejudice
against me, which I will not attempt
------------------ the contrary, I confess to you, that
------------------------if I was certain MissHamilton had any Affection for me, & there was
------a probability of my making her happier than
------------------------she appears to me to be at home, I should not think I behaved
------either ungratefully or injuriously to you, in marrying
------without Your consent; for it has always been the
doctrine taught me by my own father, & which
I still profess; that Children are, by the Law of
God & Nature, entitled to the Disposal of their



own Persons, when arrived at the Years of Discretion,
although their Parents ought ever to offer them their
best Assistance & Advice. -- Should this declaration
of my sentiments, my dear Madam, give you any
Concern, (which, from Miss Hamilton's behaviour to
me, I think it never ought,) I shall not take
amiss your giving me no more invitations to your
House; & I promise you, (to make you entirely easy,)
that before Miss Hamilton's Return from London,
I shall have found out some Other Retreat. --
      I am, with constant regard,
Dear Madam, Your much obliged &
                                                         affectionate humble Servant
John Hope

Sunday, 13 December

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Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from John Hope to Mrs Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/6/8/3

Correspondence Details

Author: John Hope

Place sent: Northampton (certainty: low)

Addressee: Mary Catherine Hamilton (née Dufresne)

Place received: Northampton (certainty: low)

Date sent: 13 December 1774

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from John Hope to Mary Hamilton's mother, relating to Hope's intentions towards Mary. He notes his affection for Mary, explaining that he imagined Mrs Hamilton could have no objection other than his lack of fortune. He notes that both Mary's and her mother's behaviour has changed towards him, and he wonders why. He believes that Mrs [name censored] had told Mrs Hamilton that she was acting wrongly in trusting Hamilton in his company. The letter continues on Hope's intentions towards Mary, assuring Mrs Hamilton that if she has any concerns, he will understand if he receives no further invitations to her home.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 378 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2017/18 provided by Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Georgia Tutt, MA student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Katie Grime, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2018)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 23 April 2020

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