Single Letter

HAM/1/7/12/13

Letter from Mrs Walkinshaw to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


13.

      My Dear Miʃs Hamilton,

      I was ill in bed yesterday when I received your very obliging
note and tho' I am better to day, my Cold is still but very indifferent,
and I am sorry to have been so much in the fashion, as thy tell me it is
the complaint that is so much about,
believe me my Dear Madam, I have regretted extremely the seeing you
so little as I have done for some time past, but when you know the
real distreʃs I have been in, from the death of a very favourite
Sister, I am sure your humanity will make you pitty me,
for four weeks I expected every post would bring me the account
of her death, and dur-ing that whole whole time, I had not
spirits to goe any where or doe any thing, so that my own
health has been much hurt, and now this last weeks
illneʃs has allmost over-set me, but I hope I shall now soon
get the better of it, I am very sensible there is but one



Topice of Comfort, and that will never fail in any Calamity,
if properly applied, I mean Submiʃsion to the will of god
in time that most operate its affaects,
but pray tell me when you doe goe out of town, and when
first, I hope I should be able to see you tomorrow if you
could call, but if it should so happen that you have not
time to come before you leave town that you will be aʃsured
without flattery or Compliment, that it would give me
a very real pleasure, to have any opportunity to convince
My Dear Miʃs Hamilton that I am
her most affectionate friend and obdt Servt

Cath: Walkinshaw

Maddox Street
Saturday 1st. June 1782[1]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. This dateline appears to the left of the signature.

Normalised Text



      My Dear Miss Hamilton,

      I was ill in bed yesterday when I received your very obliging
note and though I am better to day, my Cold is still but very indifferent,
and I am sorry to have been so much in the fashion, as they tell me it is
the complaint that is so much about,
believe me my Dear Madam, I have regretted extremely the seeing you
so little as I have done for some time past, but when you know the
real distress I have been in, from the death of a very favourite
Sister, I am sure your humanity will make you pity me,
for four weeks I expected every post would bring me the account
of her death, and during that whole time, I had not
spirits to go any where or do any thing, so that my own
health has been much hurt, and now this last weeks
illness has almost over-set me, but I hope I shall now soon
get the better of it, I am very sensible there is but one



Topic of Comfort, and that will never fail in any Calamity,
if properly applied, I mean Submission to the will of god
in time that must operate its effects,
but pray tell me when you do go out of town, and when
first, I hope I should be able to see you tomorrow if you
could call, but if it should so happen that you have not
time to come before you leave town that you will be assured
without flattery or Compliment, that it would give me
a very real pleasure, to have any opportunity to convince
My Dear Miss Hamilton that I am
her most affectionate friend and obedient Servant

Catherine Walkinshaw

Maddox Street
Saturday 1st. June 1782

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. This dateline appears to the left of the signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Mrs Walkinshaw to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/7/12/13

Correspondence Details

Author: Catherine Walkinshaw

Place sent: London

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 1 June 1782

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Catherine Walkinshaw to Mary Hamilton, relating to the death of Walkinshaw's 'very favourite Sister' and to her own health. Before she died, 'for four weeks I expected every post would bring me the account of her death, and during that whole time, I had not spirits to goe any where or doe any thing, so that my own health has been much hurt, and now this last week[']s illness has allmost over-set me.' Although she has been in real distress following the death, she acknowledges that there is one comfort that 'will never fail in any Calamit[y]', and she submits to the will of God.
    Dated at Maddox Street, [London].
    Original reference No. 13.
   

Length: 2 sheets, 298 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2016/17 provided by The John Rylands Research Institute.

Research assistant: Sarah Connor, undergraduate student, University of Manchester

Research assistant: Carla Seabra-Dacosta, MA student, University of Vigo

Transliterator: Katarina Saarnia, MA student, Uppsala University (submitted May 2017)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

Document Image (pdf)