Single Letter

HAM/1/7/12/3

Letter from Mrs Catherine Walkinshaw to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


3.

      My Dear Miʃs Hamilton

      I had the favour to receive yours by Mondays post,
and in obedienc to her Majestys Commands have sent all the
notting I have done, there is two little balls of fourteen seams
in each, and there remains thirteen scans of the Blue and
the same of the orange, which I will doe and send by the very
first opportunity, I am very sorry the blue was not finished
as I must allways be happy to obey her Majestys Commands,
you give me infinite pleasure by informing me of the Royal
Family being all in good health, and that Chamine
Spirited Prince William[1] likes his situation, that every
thing thats good may ever attend the whole is my earnest wish,
I don't wonder you are partial to Windsor it is a sweet
retreat, a delightfull Country, and must afford more



amuse-ment than Kew, by that time Lord and Lady Boston
will be returned from there expidition, and I hope you
will be there and see there pretty new house, the day you
was at Hedsor was so bad you could have no notion
of the glorious situation, and prospects that are there,
I was very sorry I aʃsure you my Dear Miʃs Hamilton, I Could
not wait of you befor I left Town, the weather was very
hott, and I was not very well which prevented me, but
hope pleas god I am pretty well in the Winter, to see
you very often, I am very much flattered by what you
tell me of her Majestys honouring me with her obliging
inquirrys, I doe aʃsure you my dear Madam my Vanity
does not proceed from her being a great Queen, but her
great and eminent vertues, must make me allway valliw
her aprobation, and feel happy if I can deserve them;



I beg you will present my respectfull duty with the notting,
this is a charmine sweet place but we have not had
very good weather till yesterday, I hope it will now
continue for the Harvest is just begune, and I have
been in destreʃs for poor Mrs de-Grey who has been very
miserable about her Children, by my last letter from
her the Eldest boy was in good way, but poor little
Charlote had not got them, which it is much to be
feared she will, and she is so delicate that I wish
she may doe well, I will not trouble you any longer
but to aʃsure you I am with great regard
                                                         My Dear Madam
Your affectionat and much obliged

Cath Walkinshaw


Hale Jully 28th
1779[2]

Lady Elizabeth Archer
not Lady Archer shall be glad
to hear from you when you have lesure[3]



My Cousin Mrs. Walkinshaw
wth. meʃsages to ye. Queen &c

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. William IV (William Henry; 1765–1837), third son of George III and younger brother and successor to George IV.
 2. This dateline appeara to the left of the closing salutation and signature.
 3. This postscript also appears to the left of the signature.

Normalised Text



      My Dear Miss Hamilton

      I had the favour to receive yours by Mondays post,
and in obedience to her Majestys Commands have sent all the
knotting I have done, there is two little balls of fourteen seams
in each, and there remains thirteen skeins of the Blue and
the same of the orange, which I will do and send by the very
first opportunity, I am very sorry the blue was not finished
as I must always be happy to obey her Majestys Commands,
you give me infinite pleasure by informing me of the Royal
Family being all in good health, and that Charming
Spirited Prince William likes his situation, that every
thing thats good may ever attend the whole is my earnest wish,
I don't wonder you are partial to Windsor it is a sweet
retreat, a delightful Country, and must afford more



amuse-ment than Kew, by that time Lord and Lady Boston
will be returned from their expedition, and I hope you
will be there and see their pretty new house, the day you
was at Hedsor was so bad you could have no notion
of the glorious situation, and prospects that are there,
I was very sorry I assure you my Dear Miss Hamilton, I Could
not wait of you before I left Town, the weather was very
hot, and I was not very well which prevented me, but
hope please god I am pretty well in the Winter, to see
you very often, I am very much flattered by what you
tell me of her Majestys honouring me with her obliging
inquiries, I do assure you my dear Madam my Vanity
does not proceed from her being a great Queen, but her
great and eminent virtues, must make me always value
her approbation, and feel happy if I can deserve them;



I beg you will present my respectful duty with the knotting,
this is a charming sweet place but we have not had
very good weather till yesterday, I hope it will now
continue for the Harvest is just begun, and I have
been in distress for poor Mrs de-Grey who has been very
miserable about her Children, by my last letter from
her the Eldest boy was in good way, but poor little
Charlotte had not got them, which it is much to be
feared she will, and she is so delicate that I wish
she may do well, I will not trouble you any longer
but to assure you I am with great regard
                                                         My Dear Madam
Your affectionate and much obliged

Catherine Walkinshaw


Hale July 28th
1779

Lady Elizabeth Archer
not Lady Archer shall be glad
to hear from you when you have leisure



(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. William IV (William Henry; 1765–1837), third son of George III and younger brother and successor to George IV.
 2. This dateline appeara to the left of the closing salutation and signature.
 3. This postscript also appears to the left of the signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Mrs Catherine Walkinshaw to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/7/12/3

Correspondence Details

Author: Catherine Walkinshaw

Place sent: Hale, Hants.

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 28 July 1779

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Catherine Walkinshaw to Mary Hamilton, relating to the 'knotting' that Walkinshaw has done for the Queen and to general news of friends.
    Original reference No. 3.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 451 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Isabella Formisano, former MA student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Alexandra Morton, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2016)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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