Single Letter

HAM/1/7/12/6

Letter from Mrs Catherine Walkinshaw to Mary Hamilton

Diplomatic Text


6.

      My Dear Miʃs Hamilton

      I hope this will find you perfectly well, and that
you as well as the young Royall family found great benefeit from
the Sea Air, I did intend paying my Complements to you when
I was at Brighthelmston,[1] but was told the road to east Burn[2] was
bad and ferrys to Croʃs which frightend me, but was glad to hear from
Lady Mary Hume the Princes and Prenceʃs's wear all perfectly well,
I now give you the trouble of this to beg the favour you will be so
good to get me a little more of the flark silk for noting, as what
I have is done, if you will put it up carefully and direct it for
me at Lady Elizabeth Archer's Hale, and give it to Mr Cadman he
will send it by the Salisbury Coach, and it will Come very safe
I would have sent what is done, but if it is not immediatly
wanted, I thought it better to keep it and bring it my self, as I shall be



in town the begining of Decr, but those long evenings in the Country
require a little Idle work, I will be much obliged to you to send
it Soon, and wish you much joy of the young Prince, and
I rejoice extremly at his Majestys happy recovery, nobody
can more earnestly wish every happyneʃs to the King and her,
the meeting of Parlement so early I fancy will bring most of
your friends to town, which will make it agreeable to you, other-
-wise
the weather is now so fine one should regrate leaveing
the Country, is Mrs Graham gone I was happy to hear she was so
much recovered, and I am glad the Duke of Athol is chose
one of the sixteen peers,[3] which I hope will bring the Dutches
to town, She writs me word her nursing goes on well and a pretty
fair Child which is uncommon in that family, I shall hope to hear from
you and beg you will beleive very Sincerly
                                                         Dear Madam
your affectionat and much obliged

Cath Walkinshaw

Hale[4] by Downton Wilts Octr 30th
                              1780[5]

(hover over blue text or annotations for clarification;
red text is normalised and/or unformatted in other panel)


Notes


 1. Brighton.
 2. Eastbourne.
 3. Under the Treaty of Union (signed 1706, taking effect from 1707), sixteen Scottish peers were entitled to sit in the House of Lords (Wikipedia).
 4. Hale is just over the Hampshire border from Downton.
 5. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.

Normalised Text



      My Dear Miss Hamilton

      I hope this will find you perfectly well, and that
you as well as the young Royal family found great benefit from
the Sea Air, I did intend paying my Compliments to you when
I was at Brighthelmston, but was told the road to east Bourne was
bad and ferrys to Cross which frightened me, but was glad to hear from
Lady Mary Hume the Princes and Princess's were all perfectly well,
I now give you the trouble of this to beg the favour you will be so
good to get me a little more of the flark silk for knotting, as what
I have is done, if you will put it up carefully and direct it for
me at Lady Elizabeth Archer's Hale, and give it to Mr Cadman he
will send it by the Salisbury Coach, and it will Come very safe
I would have sent what is done, but if it is not immediately
wanted, I thought it better to keep it and bring it my self, as I shall be



in town the beginning of December, but those long evenings in the Country
require a little Idle work, I will be much obliged to you to send
it Soon, and wish you much joy of the young Prince, and
I rejoice extremely at his Majestys happy recovery, nobody
can more earnestly wish every happiness to the King and her,
the meeting of Parliament so early I fancy will bring most of
your friends to town, which will make it agreeable to you, otherwise
the weather is now so fine one should regret leaving
the Country, is Mrs Graham gone I was happy to hear she was so
much recovered, and I am glad the Duke of Atholl is chosen
one of the sixteen peers, which I hope will bring the Duchess
to town, She writes me word her nursing goes on well and a pretty
fair Child which is uncommon in that family, I shall hope to hear from
you and beg you will believe very Sincerely
                                                         Dear Madam
your affectionate and much obliged

Catherine Walkinshaw

Hale by Downton Wiltshire October 30th
               1780

(consult diplomatic text or XML for annotations, deletions, clarifications,
quotations,
spellings, uncorrected forms, split words, abbreviations, formatting)



 1. Brighton.
 2. Eastbourne.
 3. Under the Treaty of Union (signed 1706, taking effect from 1707), sixteen Scottish peers were entitled to sit in the House of Lords (Wikipedia).
 4. Hale is just over the Hampshire border from Downton.
 5. This dateline appears to the left of the closing salutation and signature.

Metadata

Library References

Repository: The John Rylands Library, University of Manchester

Archive: Mary Hamilton Papers

Item title: Letter from Mrs Catherine Walkinshaw to Mary Hamilton

Shelfmark: HAM/1/7/12/6

Correspondence Details

Author: Catherine Walkinshaw

Place sent: Hale, Hants.

Addressee: Mary Hamilton

Place received: unknown

Date sent: 30 October 1780

Letter Description

Summary: Letter from Catherine Walkinshaw to Mary Hamilton. She hopes that Hamilton as well as the Royal family are benefiting from the sea air, and asks for more silk to be sent to her so she can continue with her work. She writes on the King's recovery and notes that as Parliament is meeting so early it may bring many of Hamilton's friends to town, which will be very agreeable to her.
    Original reference No. 6.
   

Length: 1 sheet, 361 words

Transliteration Information

Editorial declaration: First edited in the project 'Image to Text' (David Denison & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2013-2019), now incorporated in the project 'Unlocking the Mary Hamilton Papers' (Hannah Barker, Sophie Coulombeau, David Denison, Tino Oudesluijs, Cassandra Ulph, Christine Wallis & Nuria Yáñez-Bouza, 2019-2022).

All quotation marks are retained in the text and are represented by appropriate Unicode characters. Words split across two lines may have a hyphen on the first, the second or both fragments (reco-|ver, imperfect|-ly, satisfacti-|-on); or a double hyphen (pur=|port, dan|=ger, qua=|=litys); or none (respect|ing). Any point in abbreviations with superscripted letter(s) is placed last, regardless of relative left-right orientation in the original. Thus, Mrs. or Mrs may occur, but M.rs or Mr.s do not.

Acknowledgements: XML version: Research Assistant funding in 2014/15 and 2015/16 provided by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester.

Research assistant: Isabella Formisano, former MA student, University of Manchester

Transliterator: Sophie Iveson, undergraduate student, University of Manchester (submitted May 2016)

Cataloguer: Lisa Crawley, Archivist, The John Rylands Library

Cataloguer: John Hodgson, Head of Special Collections, The John Rylands Library

Copyright: Transcriptions, notes and TEI/XML © the editors

Revision date: 13 April 2020

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